There are some characteristics that are common to each category: solid wood is more frequently site-finished, is always in a plank format, is generally thicker than engineered wood, and is usually installed by nailing. Engineered wood is more frequently pre-finished, has bevelled edges, is very rarely site-finished, and is installed with glue or as a floating installation. [6]

A number of proprietary features for solid wood floors are available. Many solid woods come with grooves cut into the back of the wood that run the length of each plank, often called 'absorption strips,' that are intended to reduce cupping. Solid wood floors are mostly manufactured 0.75 inches (19 mm) thick with a tongue-and-groove for installation. Hardwood Floors


Solid hardwood floors are made of planks milled from a single piece of timber. Solid hardwood floors were originally used for structural purposes, being installed perpendicular to the wooden support beams of a building known as joists or bearers. With the increased use of concrete as a subfloor in some parts of the world, engineered wood flooring has gained some popularity. However, solid wood floors are still common and popular. Solid wood floors have a thicker wear surface and can be sanded and finished more times than an engineered wood floor.[2] It is not uncommon for homes in New England, Eastern Canada, USA, and Europe to have the original solid wood floor still in use today. Denver Hardwood Flooring
You may be on the fence about your decision to refinish your hardwood floors because you wonder if your floors are a candidate for refinishing. The truth is, not all hardwood floors can be refinished. Although most common problems can be addressed and fixed without replacing the entire floor, there are some exceptions. Consider the following to make an informed decision. Denver Hardwood Flooring
For example, moisture can be a factor, as variations in moisture can lead to gapping and warping. For this reason, installing hardwood flooring in full bathrooms is not recommended because of the fluctuating moisture levels. Follow manufacturer recommendations relating to moisture before selecting and installing hardwood. For more protection against moisture, use a moisture barrier.

Refinishing a floor takes a lot of time. You’ll need to remove all of the furniture from the room. The wood needs to be sanded bare. If you need to make a structural or cosmetic repair, you must do so before staining and coating. During the week that all of this is going on, nothing else can happen in that room. Dogs cannot walk through and sniff everything, children cannot bounce their balls, dust is everywhere, and the smell is enough to kill you. Well not really, but you get the idea. All of this time and trouble is reason enough for some homeowners to prefer having the old floor ripped out to put in something fresh and new. Hardwood Floors


Eliminate any problem spots to make the subfloor level. Sand minor humps down with a hand-held or orbital sander to make the subfloor level. To fill any dips or low spots, use a leveling compound (also known as floor patch). Mix up the compound according to package directions, fill in the dips, then pull your straight piece of lumber back and forth over the spot to flatten and level it with the rest of the subfloor.[7] Hardwood Floors

We had bought and installed this beautiful product in our downstairs a few years ago. It's now time to do the upstairs and the product was the same excellent value for the price. Arrived quicker than we needed, but gives it time to acclimate to our home. We will be using the same installer and he was happy we are ordering the same product from the same company. He was VERY impressed by the quality of the product last time. I'm excited to see the completed project as I love this wood on our main floor. Denver Hardwood Floors
Because tongue-and-groove boards are locked in place, removal involves cutting out the middle of each damaged board. The easiest way is to bore a 1-in.-dia. hole through both ends of each damaged board (photo 1). Then use a circular saw to connect the two holes (photo 2). Follow these steps to safely make the plunge cuts you need to repair your hardwood floors: 1. Adjust the depth of cut to the thickness of the floorboards. Plug in the saw and put on eye protection. 2. Pull back the retractable blade guard with your thumb. Then hold the nose of the baseplate on the floorboard and lift up the rear of the saw. 3. Align the blade with the right edge of one of the holes. Make sure the blade isn't touching the floor, then squeeze the trigger and slowly lower the spinning blade into the board. 4. Grip the saw firmly with both hands and guide it in a straight line until you cut into the right edge of the hole at the opposite end of the board. 5. Move back to the first hole, align the blade with the left edge and cut to the left edge of the second hole. Pry out the middle section with a hammer and chisel. Chop out the remaining edges, being careful not to damage any surrounding boards (photo 3). The "tongue" piece will be nailed in place, so break it out in small pieces. Then pull out the nails with a hammer or locking pliers. The existing floorboards have a tongue and groove milled on each end and along the edges. Chop off the tongue exposed by the board you just removed so you can slip in the new board (photo 4). Denver Hardwood Floors
While the overall thickness of flooring is going to vary by category, it is still important to know what is contributing to that thickness. Engineered wood flooring can inflate thickness by adding more layers of plywood or particle board, but still only offer a thin veneer of real wood on top. The dense core allows for Rigid Core floors to be significantly thinner than traditional hardwood floors, with WPC floors being thicker than SPC products. That doesn’t mean all Rigid Core floors are made equally though. Just like how engineered hardwood flooring can inflate thickness, Rigid Core flooring can alter the overall thickness by increasing the size of the acoustical padding on the back. While this padding adds a lot of great features, it doesn’t need to be any thicker than 1mm in size. When it comes to Rigid Core flooring, the thickness of the core is most important. Hardwood Floors
Solid hardwood is great for high traffic areas and rooms on the first or second floors where there’s limited moisture. You can purchase your solid hardwood floors either prefinished or unfinished. Prefinished hardwood floors have a coating that protects them and they’re ready to install right out of the box. Unfinished hardwoods allow you to apply your own stain color. Hardwood Floors
Because tongue-and-groove boards are locked in place, removal involves cutting out the middle of each damaged board. The easiest way is to bore a 1-in.-dia. hole through both ends of each damaged board (photo 1). Then use a circular saw to connect the two holes (photo 2). Follow these steps to safely make the plunge cuts you need to repair your hardwood floors: 1. Adjust the depth of cut to the thickness of the floorboards. Plug in the saw and put on eye protection. 2. Pull back the retractable blade guard with your thumb. Then hold the nose of the baseplate on the floorboard and lift up the rear of the saw. 3. Align the blade with the right edge of one of the holes. Make sure the blade isn't touching the floor, then squeeze the trigger and slowly lower the spinning blade into the board. 4. Grip the saw firmly with both hands and guide it in a straight line until you cut into the right edge of the hole at the opposite end of the board. 5. Move back to the first hole, align the blade with the left edge and cut to the left edge of the second hole. Pry out the middle section with a hammer and chisel. Chop out the remaining edges, being careful not to damage any surrounding boards (photo 3). The "tongue" piece will be nailed in place, so break it out in small pieces. Then pull out the nails with a hammer or locking pliers. The existing floorboards have a tongue and groove milled on each end and along the edges. Chop off the tongue exposed by the board you just removed so you can slip in the new board (photo 4). Denver Hardwood Floors
You cannot restore every wood floor by simply refinishing it. If your wood floor has become warped or if several of the planks have become damaged, you will typically need to replace the entire floor, as finishing will only brighten an already-damaged surface. On really old floors, you may see the tongue where the boards come together, or your boards may lack adequate thickness. Floors like this are definite candidates for replacement, as refinishing is purely cosmetic. Denver Hardwood Flooring

Solid hardwood is great for high traffic areas and rooms on the first or second floors where there’s limited moisture. You can purchase your solid hardwood floors either prefinished or unfinished. Prefinished hardwood floors have a coating that protects them and they’re ready to install right out of the box. Unfinished hardwoods allow you to apply your own stain color. Hardwood Floors
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