Choosing teak for your hardwood floors can be a smart choice. You’ll find teak is resistant to pests, as the natural oils found in the wood are undesirable to most insects, including termites. Teak is also a water-resistant wood choice, a bonus if you have young, active children or pets that come indoors soaking wet after walks in the rain. Teak bears an attractive reddish-brown color. However, if left untreated, teak can turn a silver color if exposed to UV rays of sunlight. To prevent discoloration and wear, you can treat the wood with a coating of oil to seal it so that you can enjoy beautiful teak floors for years to come. Denver Hardwood Floors
Start by cleaning the entire area around the scratch. You will want to remove all traces of dust and grime on the floor before you begin any other steps. Pay close attention to the inside of the crack itself, which should be totally free of dirt, if possible. If you have a wax layer, use a wax remover solution to clear away the wax before you begin the repair.
Some benefits of wood flooring include ease of cleaning, durability, and style variety. Wood floors are much easier to keep clean than carpet and pet hair or dander is quick to remove. They are very durable and with proper care, they will look great for years to come. Plus, wood flooring is available in a multitude of styles and colors guaranteeing there is a look out there for a classic or contemporary home. Denver Hardwood Flooring
There are some characteristics that are common to each category: solid wood is more frequently site-finished, is always in a plank format, is generally thicker than engineered wood, and is usually installed by nailing. Engineered wood is more frequently pre-finished, has bevelled edges, is very rarely site-finished, and is installed with glue or as a floating installation. [6] Denver Hardwood Flooring
You may be on the fence about your decision to refinish your hardwood floors because you wonder if your floors are a candidate for refinishing. The truth is, not all hardwood floors can be refinished. Although most common problems can be addressed and fixed without replacing the entire floor, there are some exceptions. Consider the following to make an informed decision. Denver Hardwood Floors
Wood flooring is any product manufactured from timber that is designed for use as flooring, either structural or aesthetic. Wood is a common choice as a flooring material and can come in various styles, colors, cuts, and species. Bamboo flooring is often considered a form of wood flooring, although it is made from a grass (bamboo) rather than a timber.[1]

Solid hardwood floors are made of planks milled from a single piece of timber. Solid hardwood floors were originally used for structural purposes, being installed perpendicular to the wooden support beams of a building known as joists or bearers. With the increased use of concrete as a subfloor in some parts of the world, engineered wood flooring has gained some popularity. However, solid wood floors are still common and popular. Solid wood floors have a thicker wear surface and can be sanded and finished more times than an engineered wood floor.[2] It is not uncommon for homes in New England, Eastern Canada, USA, and Europe to have the original solid wood floor still in use today. Denver Hardwood Flooring

Solid hardwood is great for high traffic areas and rooms on the first or second floors where there’s limited moisture. You can purchase your solid hardwood floors either prefinished or unfinished. Prefinished hardwood floors have a coating that protects them and they’re ready to install right out of the box. Unfinished hardwoods allow you to apply your own stain color. Hardwood Floors
Wood flooring is any product manufactured from timber that is designed for use as flooring, either structural or aesthetic. Wood is a common choice as a flooring material and can come in various styles, colors, cuts, and species. Bamboo flooring is often considered a form of wood flooring, although it is made from a grass (bamboo) rather than a timber.[1] Denver Hardwood Flooring
Because tongue-and-groove boards are locked in place, removal involves cutting out the middle of each damaged board. The easiest way is to bore a 1-in.-dia. hole through both ends of each damaged board (photo 1). Then use a circular saw to connect the two holes (photo 2). Follow these steps to safely make the plunge cuts you need to repair your hardwood floors: 1. Adjust the depth of cut to the thickness of the floorboards. Plug in the saw and put on eye protection. 2. Pull back the retractable blade guard with your thumb. Then hold the nose of the baseplate on the floorboard and lift up the rear of the saw. 3. Align the blade with the right edge of one of the holes. Make sure the blade isn't touching the floor, then squeeze the trigger and slowly lower the spinning blade into the board. 4. Grip the saw firmly with both hands and guide it in a straight line until you cut into the right edge of the hole at the opposite end of the board. 5. Move back to the first hole, align the blade with the left edge and cut to the left edge of the second hole. Pry out the middle section with a hammer and chisel. Chop out the remaining edges, being careful not to damage any surrounding boards (photo 3). The "tongue" piece will be nailed in place, so break it out in small pieces. Then pull out the nails with a hammer or locking pliers. The existing floorboards have a tongue and groove milled on each end and along the edges. Chop off the tongue exposed by the board you just removed so you can slip in the new board (photo 4). Denver Hardwood Floor Install
The Blue Ridge Hickory Morning Fog 3/4 in. The Blue Ridge Hickory Morning Fog 3/4 in. Solid Hardwood Flooring is sealed with an Alpha Alumina finish providing protection from every day wear. This product carries a 50-year finish warranty. Each plank features a micro beveled edge and micro beveled end. You can feel confident purchasing this product because ...  More + Product Details Close Denver Hardwood Flooring
Glue down engineered hardwood, alternatively. If you don't want to nail down the boards, you do have the option of using adhesive to put engineered hardwood in place. It's a good choice, but won't last as long or be as sturdy as nailed down hardwood. The procedure is very similar to the nail-down process. Follow the adhesive manufacturer's instructions for installation and drying times.[11] Hardwood Floors
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