Make cuts perpendicular to the direction the wood is laying. Using a circular saw, make single cuts straight across the flooring that are about 1 foot (30 cm) to 2 feet (61 cm) apart. Be sure your cuts are perpendicular to the direction of the wood. Start on 1 side of the room and work your way systematically to the other side, spacing each cut about 1 foot (30 cm) to 2 feet (61 cm) apart.[3] Denver Hardwood Floors
If you have a small, single scratch that’s only noticeable when you get close (like a scratch caused by an excited pet) and your floor has a relatively new finish, try a DIY home solution first. Mix equal parts apple cider vinegar and olive oil in a small cup, and dab the mixture into the scratch. Leave it for the rest of the day, and rub it out. This method often takes care of minor scratches.

"Click" or Woodloc systems: there are a number of patented "click" systems that now exist. These click systems are either "unilin" or "fiboloc" A "click" floor is similar to tongue-and-groove, but instead of fitting directly into the groove, the board must be angled or "tapped" in to make the curved or barbed tongue fit into the modified groove. No adhesive is used when installing a "click" floor, making board replacement easier. This system not only exists for engineered wood floors but also engineered bamboo and a small number of solid floors (such as "parador solido click") and is designed to be used for floating installations. It is beneficial for the Do-It-Yourself market.
Engineered wood flooring was created to lower the cost of wood flooring and attempt to fix some of solid wood’s shortcomings. It’s constructed from inexpensive plywood or particle board and topped with a thin veneer of hardwood. This construction helps with installation flexibility and slightly improves indent performance, but it adds a new set of problems as well. Because the “real” wood part of the floor is just a thin veneer, damage from scratches can be irreparable. Engineered wood floors are still made from porous wood, meaning they can’t be subjected to water. Denver Hardwood Floors

Price is the first obvious variable to consider. It is almost always cheaper to refinish your floor than to replace it. When replacing, you must consider the cost of the new wood as well as the installation. You can offset much of this cost by installing the floor yourself, but this is a very invasive process that requires specialized knowledge and precision. You can typically refinish a wood floor yourself, with just a few inexpensive solutions.
Refinishing a floor takes a lot of time. You’ll need to remove all of the furniture from the room. The wood needs to be sanded bare. If you need to make a structural or cosmetic repair, you must do so before staining and coating. During the week that all of this is going on, nothing else can happen in that room. Dogs cannot walk through and sniff everything, children cannot bounce their balls, dust is everywhere, and the smell is enough to kill you. Well not really, but you get the idea. All of this time and trouble is reason enough for some homeowners to prefer having the old floor ripped out to put in something fresh and new. Hardwood Floors
Natural warmth and beauty make wood a favorite for floors. But when the topcoat finish wears through, the porous surface of the wood is open to stains-especially beneath dining room chairs, in front of a sink and in other high-traffic, high-spill areas. Oil soap and all-purpose cleanser remove some stains, especially when the spill is fresh. But it's impossible to scrub out stains that have soaked into the wood fibers. And sanding only creates a depression in the floor that's more noticeable than the stain. The only option to repair hardwood floors at this point is to cut out the stained floorboards and install new ones. We replaced a couple of boards from a standard 3/4-in.-thick x 21/4-in.-wide oak-strip floor using a drill, circular saw and sharp chisel. To determine the exact width and thickness of the pieces you'll need, lift up a heat register or threshold and measure the exposed ends of the floorboards. You'll find hardwood flooring at a local millwork shop, lumberyard or floor-covering store. Denver Hardwood Flooring
Engineered wood flooring was created to lower the cost of wood flooring and attempt to fix some of solid wood’s shortcomings. It’s constructed from inexpensive plywood or particle board and topped with a thin veneer of hardwood. This construction helps with installation flexibility and slightly improves indent performance, but it adds a new set of problems as well. Because the “real” wood part of the floor is just a thin veneer, damage from scratches can be irreparable. Engineered wood floors are still made from porous wood, meaning they can’t be subjected to water. Denver Hardwood Flooring
Generally, hardwood floors need to be buffed every 3–5 years. The process usually takes about one day. Buffing refers to the process of using a stand up floor buffer. The floor is abraded with 180 grit screen on the buffer. This allows for the new coat of finish to mechanically adhere to the floor. This process works with great results as long as the floor hasn't had any waxes or synthetic cleaners. Denver Hardwood Floors
Start by cleaning the entire area around the scratch. You will want to remove all traces of dust and grime on the floor before you begin any other steps. Pay close attention to the inside of the crack itself, which should be totally free of dirt, if possible. If you have a wax layer, use a wax remover solution to clear away the wax before you begin the repair. Denver Hardwood Floors
The hardwood flooring we offer delivers unmatched beauty, durability, structural strength, and overall long life to your home or commercial space. Hardwood flooring is in a class by itself; not just a choice in flooring, but more like a tradition. We make sure that all of the hardwood floors we offer honor that tradition, and meet all of your expectations too, ensuring you receive the perfect hardwood floor for your living space. Hardwood Floors
Glue down engineered hardwood, alternatively. If you don't want to nail down the boards, you do have the option of using adhesive to put engineered hardwood in place. It's a good choice, but won't last as long or be as sturdy as nailed down hardwood. The procedure is very similar to the nail-down process. Follow the adhesive manufacturer's instructions for installation and drying times.[11] Hardwood Floors
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