Natural warmth and beauty make wood a favorite for floors. But when the topcoat finish wears through, the porous surface of the wood is open to stains-especially beneath dining room chairs, in front of a sink and in other high-traffic, high-spill areas. Oil soap and all-purpose cleanser remove some stains, especially when the spill is fresh. But it's impossible to scrub out stains that have soaked into the wood fibers. And sanding only creates a depression in the floor that's more noticeable than the stain. The only option to repair hardwood floors at this point is to cut out the stained floorboards and install new ones. We replaced a couple of boards from a standard 3/4-in.-thick x 21/4-in.-wide oak-strip floor using a drill, circular saw and sharp chisel. To determine the exact width and thickness of the pieces you'll need, lift up a heat register or threshold and measure the exposed ends of the floorboards. You'll find hardwood flooring at a local millwork shop, lumberyard or floor-covering store. Denver Hardwood Flooring

Installing new solid or engineered hardwood flooring will add value and elegance to your home. Although they offer the same timeless look and sense of warmth, engineered hardwood and solid hardwood do offer a few key differences. For example, engineered hardwood is manufactured from three or more layers of fiberboard, and a real hardwood veneer top layer. Contrastly, solid hardwood is milled from a real hardwood species, making it the sole material used in this type of flooring. Learn more differences here!
If your floor has noticeable scratches throughout, your best option is to sand down the floor and refinish it. A complete sanding removes scratches, but beware: This only works on real wood floors, not bamboo. If you have an engineered wood floor with a real wood surface, make sure the real wood surface is more than 1mm thick—sanding usually takes at least this much wood off the surface, so a thicker layer is required for a complete sanding.
Regardless of the floor, the protective finish will play a large role in how scratch and stain resistant it is. Both hardwood and Rigid Core flooring are available with various types of protective finishes. Rigid Core flooring goes a step beyond hardwood though, and also has a transparent solid wear layer that protects against gouging and deeper scratches. Denver Hardwood Floors
If you’re thinking about redoing your hardwood floor, you might envision a refreshed look to your kitchen or hallway. You can picture your friends coming to your home for your next party and admiring your new floor, but you may find something standing in the way — you have no idea which type of hardwood flooring to get. With some research on your end, you can save yourself time and money. Let’s explore the features of some popular hardwood flooring types.
Width & Length – Plank flooring comes in a variety of widths and lengths. The most common widths are currently in the 5” – 6” range, but wider widths are rapidly becoming more popular. The length of your floor is also important to consider depending on the size of your space. Hardwood flooring comes in mixed lengths because imperfections are cut out of longer planks during production. Rigid Core flooring is built to size and comes in lengths ranging from 36” up to 80+”.
Oak has always been a popular choice for hardwood flooring. The color is visually appealing, looks inviting, and has many advantages. You’ll find the wood easier to clean, and it easily blends in with furniture and home interior designs you already have. Plus, oak is a good investment if you’re considering selling your house in the future, since the wood can last for many years. Hardwood Floors
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