Refinish, refinish, refinish! In almost every case it is preferable to refinish rather than replace hardwood floors. Part of the appeal of hardwood is that it lasts so long. A quality hardwood floor can be sanded down and refinished at least six times, and up to ten times before you need to replace it. You can change the color, closely match and replace warped, stained, or termite ingested planks, silence squeaky boards, and fill gaps or patch knots. With all of these easy solutions, why would anyone choose to replace hardwood floors? Well, here are the cases when a complete rehaul becomes a better option. Denver Hardwood Floors
Refinish, refinish, refinish! In almost every case it is preferable to refinish rather than replace hardwood floors. Part of the appeal of hardwood is that it lasts so long. A quality hardwood floor can be sanded down and refinished at least six times, and up to ten times before you need to replace it. You can change the color, closely match and replace warped, stained, or termite ingested planks, silence squeaky boards, and fill gaps or patch knots. With all of these easy solutions, why would anyone choose to replace hardwood floors? Well, here are the cases when a complete rehaul becomes a better option. Denver Hardwood Floors
Over the years, many hardwood floors develop small splits or cracks in the surface of the wood. These can be spot repaired with some angled nails to secure the two pieces together, along with some wood putty to hide the blemishes. If your floor is suffering from large cracks, however, you might want to think about refinishing the floor. And if the split is particularly bad, you should probably replace the damaged plank altogether.
Solid hardwood floors are made of planks milled from a single piece of timber. Solid hardwood floors were originally used for structural purposes, being installed perpendicular to the wooden support beams of a building known as joists or bearers. With the increased use of concrete as a subfloor in some parts of the world, engineered wood flooring has gained some popularity. However, solid wood floors are still common and popular. Solid wood floors have a thicker wear surface and can be sanded and finished more times than an engineered wood floor.[2] It is not uncommon for homes in New England, Eastern Canada, USA, and Europe to have the original solid wood floor still in use today.
Wood flooring is any product manufactured from timber that is designed for use as flooring, either structural or aesthetic. Wood is a common choice as a flooring material and can come in various styles, colors, cuts, and species. Bamboo flooring is often considered a form of wood flooring, although it is made from a grass (bamboo) rather than a timber.[1] Denver Hardwood Floor Install

There are some characteristics that are common to each category: solid wood is more frequently site-finished, is always in a plank format, is generally thicker than engineered wood, and is usually installed by nailing. Engineered wood is more frequently pre-finished, has bevelled edges, is very rarely site-finished, and is installed with glue or as a floating installation. [6] Denver Hardwood Floor Install


Make cuts perpendicular to the direction the wood is laying. Using a circular saw, make single cuts straight across the flooring that are about 1 foot (30 cm) to 2 feet (61 cm) apart. Be sure your cuts are perpendicular to the direction of the wood. Start on 1 side of the room and work your way systematically to the other side, spacing each cut about 1 foot (30 cm) to 2 feet (61 cm) apart.[3] Denver Hardwood Flooring
Regardless of the floor, the protective finish will play a large role in how scratch and stain resistant it is. Both hardwood and Rigid Core flooring are available with various types of protective finishes. Rigid Core flooring goes a step beyond hardwood though, and also has a transparent solid wear layer that protects against gouging and deeper scratches.
Solid hardwood floors are made of planks milled from a single piece of timber. Solid hardwood floors were originally used for structural purposes, being installed perpendicular to the wooden support beams of a building known as joists or bearers. With the increased use of concrete as a subfloor in some parts of the world, engineered wood flooring has gained some popularity. However, solid wood floors are still common and popular. Solid wood floors have a thicker wear surface and can be sanded and finished more times than an engineered wood floor.[2] It is not uncommon for homes in New England, Eastern Canada, USA, and Europe to have the original solid wood floor still in use today. Denver Hardwood Floors
Eliminate any problem spots to make the subfloor level. Sand minor humps down with a hand-held or orbital sander to make the subfloor level. To fill any dips or low spots, use a leveling compound (also known as floor patch). Mix up the compound according to package directions, fill in the dips, then pull your straight piece of lumber back and forth over the spot to flatten and level it with the rest of the subfloor.[7] Denver Hardwood Floor Install

If your floors are in need of a deeper cleaning, use a wood floor cleaner. Follow the instructions for diluting the cleaner in water. Clean the floors with a damp mop, going with the grain. Then, go back over the floor with a clean, damp mop to remove any excess cleaner. Finish by drying the floor completely with a dry towel. Remember, leftover standing water could damage your wood floors.

Eliminate any problem spots to make the subfloor level. Sand minor humps down with a hand-held or orbital sander to make the subfloor level. To fill any dips or low spots, use a leveling compound (also known as floor patch). Mix up the compound according to package directions, fill in the dips, then pull your straight piece of lumber back and forth over the spot to flatten and level it with the rest of the subfloor.[7] Denver Hardwood Floor Install
This process involves treating the wood by boiling the log in water. After preparation, the wood is peeled by a blade starting from the outside of the log and working toward the center, thus creating a wood veneer. The veneer is then pressed flat with high pressure. This style of manufacturing tends to have problems with the wood cupping or curling back to its original shape. Rotary-peeled engineered hardwoods tend to have a plywood appearance in the grain.[3]
The Blue Ridge Hickory Morning Fog 3/4 in. The Blue Ridge Hickory Morning Fog 3/4 in. Solid Hardwood Flooring is sealed with an Alpha Alumina finish providing protection from every day wear. This product carries a 50-year finish warranty. Each plank features a micro beveled edge and micro beveled end. You can feel confident purchasing this product because ...  More + Product Details Close
Eliminate any problem spots to make the subfloor level. Sand minor humps down with a hand-held or orbital sander to make the subfloor level. To fill any dips or low spots, use a leveling compound (also known as floor patch). Mix up the compound according to package directions, fill in the dips, then pull your straight piece of lumber back and forth over the spot to flatten and level it with the rest of the subfloor.[7] Denver Hardwood Floors
Menards® has everything you need to cover your floors in style! We offer a wide selection of hardwood flooring options that are fit to use in any room of your home. Some of our quality hardwood floorcoverings include engineered hardwood, which is built to last and has higher resistance to moisture levels. We also carry a variety of solid hardwood flooring to give your home traditional character and style. If you are interested in another durable flooring option for your home, we have cork flooring. In addition to strong and durable flooring, we offer everything you will need for installation and maintenance as well as hardwood moulding and trims to help you finish the job. Once the flooring installation is complete, keep them looking clean with our selection of vacuum cleaners and floor care products. Next, complete the look with area rugs, mats, and runners to enhance your home's décor and add coziness to the space. Denver Hardwood Floor Install

Choose your replacement hardwood flooring. You don't have to replace your old floor with the exact same wood or flooring type that you just removed! You can glue your new hardwood flooring into place if you like. You can also install nail-down, floating (or locking) hardwood flooring as a replacement. The choice is up to you and what your budget allows.
Warranty & Brand – The value of your floor extends well beyond the floor itself. The people that created, tested, produced, and support it are just as important to consider. You want to make sure you are buying a floor from a manufacturer who you can trust. What kind of testing are they doing to make sure the floor you are buying will last? How can they help you if problems do occur down the road? What does the warranty actually cover? These are important factors to consider, especially when hardwood flooring doesn’t meet Rigid Core flooring’s abilities in areas like durability, dent resistance, and waterproofing. Denver Hardwood Flooring
Maple is another great choice for hardwood flooring. Many people prefer its light tan look, which blends into home interior spaces. As one of the strongest woods, maple is a top choice for high-traffic areas of a home. The wood doesn’t scuff easily, making it a good choice for homes with children or those with a lot of foot traffic across the floors. Maple requires minimal maintenance, with weekly sweeping and annual applications of wood soap to prolong the life of the floors. Denver Hardwood Floor Install

You may be on the fence about your decision to refinish your hardwood floors because you wonder if your floors are a candidate for refinishing. The truth is, not all hardwood floors can be refinished. Although most common problems can be addressed and fixed without replacing the entire floor, there are some exceptions. Consider the following to make an informed decision. Denver Hardwood Flooring
 116% harder than Red Oak (1)  12% harder than Red Oak (11)  123% Harder than Red Oak (4)  125% harder than Red Oak (2)  141% harder than Red Oak (2)  15% softer than Red Oak (2)  165% harder than Red Oak (2)  174% harder than Red Oak (5)  18% softer than Red Oak (1)  185% harder than Red Oak (4)  198 % harder than Red Oak (2)  2% harder than Red Oak (2)  2% Softer than Red Oak (1)  25% softer than Red Oak (1)  28% harder than Red Oak (1)  30% harder than Red Oak (8)  33% harder than Red Oak (2)  41% harder than Red Oak (7)  43% harder than Red Oak (1)  5% harder than Red Oak (8)  53% softer than Red Oak (1)  6% harder than Red Oak (14)  67% harder than Red Oak (5)  74% harder than Red Oak (2)  81% harder than Red Oak (2)  82% harder than Red Oak (2)  9% softer than Red Oak (1)  about the same as Red Oak (7)  Benchmark at 1290 on Janka Scale (37) Hardwood Floors
×