With so many potential problems and repairs that a wood floor could need, you’re probably wondering how much the potential solutions will cost. It might make you feel better to know that the average wood floor repair costs around $1000, with minor repairs costing as little as a couple hundred and major jobs costing well in to the thousands. This is definitely a job that you’ll want to get a few quotes from contractors in order to feel comfortable with your particular repair needed or how you can repair the wood floor yourself. Hardwood Floors
Make cuts perpendicular to the direction the wood is laying. Using a circular saw, make single cuts straight across the flooring that are about 1 foot (30 cm) to 2 feet (61 cm) apart. Be sure your cuts are perpendicular to the direction of the wood. Start on 1 side of the room and work your way systematically to the other side, spacing each cut about 1 foot (30 cm) to 2 feet (61 cm) apart.[3] Hardwood Floors
Instead of boiling the hardwood logs, in this process they are kept at a low humidity level and dried slowly to draw moisture from the inside of the wood cells. The logs are then sawn in the same manner as for solid hardwood planks. This style of engineered hardwood has the same look as solid hardwood, and does not have any of the potential problems of "face checking" that rotary-peel and slice-peel products have, because the product is not exposed to added moisture. Denver Hardwood Flooring
Cut a new length of flooring to fit snugly into the space of the old board. It doesn't matter what kind of saw you use to repair your hardwood floors; just make sure the cuts are perfectly square. After trimming the board to length, turn it upside down and use a chisel to chop off the lower lip of the grooved edge (photo 5). That allows it to fit over the protruding tongue of the adjacent floorboard. Test-fit the new piece. If it's slightly lower than the surrounding floorboards, shim it up with strips of kraft paper. Then remove the board and spread carpenter's glue on the tongues and grooves of the new and old pieces. Slip the new board into place (photo 6), protect it with a scrap-wood block and tap it down with a hammer. Cover the board with wax paper, then hold it down overnight with heavy books or weights. An alternative to gluing: Simply face-nail the board with 6d finishing nails. Bore pilot holes at a slight angle, then drive in the nails. Tap them below the surface with a nailset (photo 7) and fill the holes with wood putty. Lightly sand the entire board smooth, but be careful not to remove too much finish from surrounding boards. After finding a matching stain color by experimenting on scraps of flooring, stain the boards to match the original floor. Let dry overnight, then apply two coats of clear polyurethane varnish. If the old floor is unstained, just apply the polyurethane.
If your floors are in need of a deeper cleaning, use a wood floor cleaner. Follow the instructions for diluting the cleaner in water. Clean the floors with a damp mop, going with the grain. Then, go back over the floor with a clean, damp mop to remove any excess cleaner. Finish by drying the floor completely with a dry towel. Remember, leftover standing water could damage your wood floors. Hardwood Floors
Price is the first obvious variable to consider. It is almost always cheaper to refinish your floor than to replace it. When replacing, you must consider the cost of the new wood as well as the installation. You can offset much of this cost by installing the floor yourself, but this is a very invasive process that requires specialized knowledge and precision. You can typically refinish a wood floor yourself, with just a few inexpensive solutions. Denver Hardwood Floor Install

Top quality laminate will not match the look and feel of real wood floors. The areas where the planks join will wear considerably over time, and when damage sets in, it is not an easy repair. Laminate is easily damaged by moisture, and when that damage sets in, it cannot be fixed. If the laminate is not laid correctly, it will not be appealing to potential renters or buyers.
Solid hardwood is great for high traffic areas and rooms on the first or second floors where there’s limited moisture. You can purchase your solid hardwood floors either prefinished or unfinished. Prefinished hardwood floors have a coating that protects them and they’re ready to install right out of the box. Unfinished hardwoods allow you to apply your own stain color.
With so many potential problems and repairs that a wood floor could need, you’re probably wondering how much the potential solutions will cost. It might make you feel better to know that the average wood floor repair costs around $1000, with minor repairs costing as little as a couple hundred and major jobs costing well in to the thousands. This is definitely a job that you’ll want to get a few quotes from contractors in order to feel comfortable with your particular repair needed or how you can repair the wood floor yourself. Hardwood Floors

Menards® has everything you need to cover your floors in style! We offer a wide selection of hardwood flooring options that are fit to use in any room of your home. Some of our quality hardwood floorcoverings include engineered hardwood, which is built to last and has higher resistance to moisture levels. We also carry a variety of solid hardwood flooring to give your home traditional character and style. If you are interested in another durable flooring option for your home, we have cork flooring. In addition to strong and durable flooring, we offer everything you will need for installation and maintenance as well as hardwood moulding and trims to help you finish the job. Once the flooring installation is complete, keep them looking clean with our selection of vacuum cleaners and floor care products. Next, complete the look with area rugs, mats, and runners to enhance your home's décor and add coziness to the space. Denver Hardwood Floors
Glue down engineered hardwood, alternatively. If you don't want to nail down the boards, you do have the option of using adhesive to put engineered hardwood in place. It's a good choice, but won't last as long or be as sturdy as nailed down hardwood. The procedure is very similar to the nail-down process. Follow the adhesive manufacturer's instructions for installation and drying times.[11] Hardwood Floors
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