You may be on the fence about your decision to refinish your hardwood floors because you wonder if your floors are a candidate for refinishing. The truth is, not all hardwood floors can be refinished. Although most common problems can be addressed and fixed without replacing the entire floor, there are some exceptions. Consider the following to make an informed decision.
Hardwood floors can last a long time, but eventually they need to be replaced. Luckily, it's a pretty straightforward process! Use a circular saw to cut the old hardwood into pieces, then remove the old flooring. Prepare your subflooring so that it's clean and perfectly level. After that, choose your replacement flooring and follow the process for installing that particular type of hardwood! Denver Hardwood Flooring
Make cuts perpendicular to the direction the wood is laying. Using a circular saw, make single cuts straight across the flooring that are about 1 foot (30 cm) to 2 feet (61 cm) apart. Be sure your cuts are perpendicular to the direction of the wood. Start on 1 side of the room and work your way systematically to the other side, spacing each cut about 1 foot (30 cm) to 2 feet (61 cm) apart.[3]
The Home Depot offers a stunning selection of solid wood and engineered flooring that is sustainably sourced to help preserve our world’s endangered forests. Installation services are available for homes of all sizes. Licensed, certified, and vetted with background checks, our professional installers show up wearing an official Home Depot badge, so you’ll know we sent them. We are transparent about our products, so you know exactly what’s being installed in your home. To help you create your dream home sooner, The Home Depot also offers financial assistance options like project loans and specialty credit cards. Denver Hardwood Floors
A number of proprietary features for solid wood floors are available. Many solid woods come with grooves cut into the back of the wood that run the length of each plank, often called 'absorption strips,' that are intended to reduce cupping. Solid wood floors are mostly manufactured 0.75 inches (19 mm) thick with a tongue-and-groove for installation.

Laminate is a cost effective option that will withstand a certain amount of wear. For an easy installation, opt for click-lock. The planks will snap together and can be laid over other flooring. It is ideal for living areas, and some brands may even construct it with a waterproof core, allowing it to be used in areas where water may be an issue. We suggest taking a close look at the guarantee before installing it in a bathroom. Hardwood Floors
This durable prefinished solid real wood floor will This durable prefinished solid real wood floor will enhance the value of your home. The flooring is made of 3/4 in. thick sawn solid wood and features mother nature's naturally occurring beauty marks such as distinctive color variation knots and mineral streaks. Plank length is totally random and varies based ...  More + Product Details Close Denver Hardwood Flooring
Cupped floors, also called washboarding, develops gradually across the width of the wood strip where the edges of the hardwood planks raise up and the center of the board sinks down. The cause of cupped floors is a moisture imbalance where there is more water on the bottom side of the wood plank than on the top. The only cure is to balance the humidity levels in your home, and to give the surface time to return back to normal. After the floor has stabilized, you can have a professional sand it flat and re-finish it to perfection. Denver Hardwood Floors
 Acacia (9)  American Walnut (1)  Ash (5)  Bamboo (22)  Beech (5)  Birch (3)  Bloodwood (2)  Brazilian Cherry (10)  Brazilian Chestnut (5)  Brazilian Koa (9)  Brazilian Oak (5)  Brazilian Walnut (5)  Cumaru (3)  Curupay (2)  Hevea (4)  Hickory (27)  Maple (14)  Oak (15)  Pecan (3)  Pine (10)  Purple Heart (2)  Red Cumaru (2)  Red Maple (1)  Red Oak (40)  Short Leaf Acacia (3)  ShortLeaf Acacia (1)  Spanish Hickory (3)  Tamboril (2)  Tauari (3)  Walnut (1)  White Oak (34) Denver Hardwood Floors
If you have a small, single scratch that’s only noticeable when you get close (like a scratch caused by an excited pet) and your floor has a relatively new finish, try a DIY home solution first. Mix equal parts apple cider vinegar and olive oil in a small cup, and dab the mixture into the scratch. Leave it for the rest of the day, and rub it out. This method often takes care of minor scratches. Denver Hardwood Floors
This process begins with the same treatment process that the rotary peel method uses. However, instead of being sliced in a rotary fashion, with this technique the wood is sliced from the log in much the same manner that lumber is sawn from a log – straight through. The veneers do not go through the same manufacturing process as rotary peeled veneers. Engineered hardwood produced this way tends to have fewer problems with "face checking", and also does not have the same plywood appearance in the grain.[3] However, the planks can tend to have edge splintering and cracking because the veneers have been submerged in water and then pressed flat. Denver Hardwood Floors
The hardwood flooring we offer delivers unmatched beauty, durability, structural strength, and overall long life to your home or commercial space. Hardwood flooring is in a class by itself; not just a choice in flooring, but more like a tradition. We make sure that all of the hardwood floors we offer honor that tradition, and meet all of your expectations too, ensuring you receive the perfect hardwood floor for your living space. Hardwood Floors

Wood flooring can also be installed utilizing the glue-down method. This is an especially popular method for solid parquet flooring installations on concrete sub-floors. Additionally, engineered wood flooring may use the glue-down method as well. A layer of mastic is placed onto the sub-floor using a trowel similar to those used in laying ceramic tile. The wood pieces are then laid on top of the glue and hammered into place using a rubber mallet and a protected 2x4 to create a level floor. Often the parquet floor will require sanding and re-finishing after the glue-down installation method due to the small size pieces. Hardwood Floors


Refinish, refinish, refinish! In almost every case it is preferable to refinish rather than replace hardwood floors. Part of the appeal of hardwood is that it lasts so long. A quality hardwood floor can be sanded down and refinished at least six times, and up to ten times before you need to replace it. You can change the color, closely match and replace warped, stained, or termite ingested planks, silence squeaky boards, and fill gaps or patch knots. With all of these easy solutions, why would anyone choose to replace hardwood floors? Well, here are the cases when a complete rehaul becomes a better option. Denver Hardwood Flooring

Wood floors offer warmth and enhance the look of your rooms while increasing the value of your home. Wood flooring comes in a variety of styles and materials from solid hardwood to engineered hardwood to bamboo. You’ll find wooden floors also comes in a number of shades. In addition to looking great, wood floors are durable making them perfect for homes with pets and children. Denver Hardwood Flooring
You may be on the fence about your decision to refinish your hardwood floors because you wonder if your floors are a candidate for refinishing. The truth is, not all hardwood floors can be refinished. Although most common problems can be addressed and fixed without replacing the entire floor, there are some exceptions. Consider the following to make an informed decision. Denver Hardwood Floors
Tongue-and-groove: One side and one end of the plank have a groove, the other side and end have a tongue (protruding wood along an edge's center). The tongue and groove fit snugly together, thus joining or aligning the planks, and are not visible once joined. Tongue-and-groove flooring can be installed by glue-down (both engineered and solid), floating (mostly engineered only), or nail-down (not recommended for most engineered). Hardwood Floors
Cut a new length of flooring to fit snugly into the space of the old board. It doesn't matter what kind of saw you use to repair your hardwood floors; just make sure the cuts are perfectly square. After trimming the board to length, turn it upside down and use a chisel to chop off the lower lip of the grooved edge (photo 5). That allows it to fit over the protruding tongue of the adjacent floorboard. Test-fit the new piece. If it's slightly lower than the surrounding floorboards, shim it up with strips of kraft paper. Then remove the board and spread carpenter's glue on the tongues and grooves of the new and old pieces. Slip the new board into place (photo 6), protect it with a scrap-wood block and tap it down with a hammer. Cover the board with wax paper, then hold it down overnight with heavy books or weights. An alternative to gluing: Simply face-nail the board with 6d finishing nails. Bore pilot holes at a slight angle, then drive in the nails. Tap them below the surface with a nailset (photo 7) and fill the holes with wood putty. Lightly sand the entire board smooth, but be careful not to remove too much finish from surrounding boards. After finding a matching stain color by experimenting on scraps of flooring, stain the boards to match the original floor. Let dry overnight, then apply two coats of clear polyurethane varnish. If the old floor is unstained, just apply the polyurethane. Denver Hardwood Flooring

Make cuts perpendicular to the direction the wood is laying. Using a circular saw, make single cuts straight across the flooring that are about 1 foot (30 cm) to 2 feet (61 cm) apart. Be sure your cuts are perpendicular to the direction of the wood. Start on 1 side of the room and work your way systematically to the other side, spacing each cut about 1 foot (30 cm) to 2 feet (61 cm) apart.[3] Denver Hardwood Flooring

Refinishing can actually take much more time than fully replacing a wood floor. Refinishing is a messy, meticulous process than can take approximately four to five days, during which the floor surface must remain completely untouched. The process requires sanders, edgers, buffers, scrapers, brushes, base coat sealers, topcoat sealers, putty knives and sometimes paint. Replacement, on the other hand, can be done in considerably less time using only lumber, a couple of saws, measuring tape, a flat bar, a chalk line and a nail gun. Hardwood Floors

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