Wood flooring can also be installed utilizing the glue-down method. This is an especially popular method for solid parquet flooring installations on concrete sub-floors. Additionally, engineered wood flooring may use the glue-down method as well. A layer of mastic is placed onto the sub-floor using a trowel similar to those used in laying ceramic tile. The wood pieces are then laid on top of the glue and hammered into place using a rubber mallet and a protected 2x4 to create a level floor. Often the parquet floor will require sanding and re-finishing after the glue-down installation method due to the small size pieces.
Hardwood species used in flooring are given a hardwood hardness rating, which indicates how resistant the wood is to dents and wear. This rating is based off a test called the Janka Hardness Test, and it measures the force needed to press a steel ball into the wood sample. The highest possible score on this test is a little over 5,000, with most traditional solid wood floors scoring in the 1,000-2,000 range. The superior density of Rigid Core flooring would exceed the limitations of the Janka test, and instead a higher impact testing is needed to measure real world performance. Here is how the general hardness of plank flooring ranks: Denver Hardwood Floors
You cannot restore every wood floor by simply refinishing it. If your wood floor has become warped or if several of the planks have become damaged, you will typically need to replace the entire floor, as finishing will only brighten an already-damaged surface. On really old floors, you may see the tongue where the boards come together, or your boards may lack adequate thickness. Floors like this are definite candidates for replacement, as refinishing is purely cosmetic. Denver Hardwood Floor Install
Solid hardwood floor planks are made from a piece of wood and made to be anywhere from 18 to 20 mm thick. The boards are made with a tongue and groove to fit together for installation. Depending on the species of wood, certain floors will be harder than others. The harder the floor, the less susceptible it is to dings and scratches. The floor can be sanded and refinished several times to restore its beauty, with the total number of times being determined by the depth of the tongue from the top of the plank.
Choose your replacement hardwood flooring. You don't have to replace your old floor with the exact same wood or flooring type that you just removed! You can glue your new hardwood flooring into place if you like. You can also install nail-down, floating (or locking) hardwood flooring as a replacement. The choice is up to you and what your budget allows.
Choosing teak for your hardwood floors can be a smart choice. You’ll find teak is resistant to pests, as the natural oils found in the wood are undesirable to most insects, including termites. Teak is also a water-resistant wood choice, a bonus if you have young, active children or pets that come indoors soaking wet after walks in the rain. Teak bears an attractive reddish-brown color. However, if left untreated, teak can turn a silver color if exposed to UV rays of sunlight. To prevent discoloration and wear, you can treat the wood with a coating of oil to seal it so that you can enjoy beautiful teak floors for years to come. Denver Hardwood Floor Install
If you have a small, single scratch that’s only noticeable when you get close (like a scratch caused by an excited pet) and your floor has a relatively new finish, try a DIY home solution first. Mix equal parts apple cider vinegar and olive oil in a small cup, and dab the mixture into the scratch. Leave it for the rest of the day, and rub it out. This method often takes care of minor scratches. Denver Hardwood Floors
No matter what type of hardwood flooring you choose, proper care and maintenance will help them look beautiful even longer. First off, don’t let the dirt and dust collect. At least once a week, you’ll want to go over your hardwood floors with a broom or dust mop to pick up any dirt, dust, hair or pet dander. If you’re using a vacuum, make sure it’s set to ‘wood floors’ so that you’re not beating up your floors and damaging them in the process. Denver Hardwood Flooring
Put on gloves, knee pads, and protective eye glasses. You'll be working diligently on your hands and knees for hours to complete this project, especially if you're doing a large space. Invest in a good pair of knee pads to protect your knees. Sturdy work gloves will protect your hands from splinters, and goggles will prevent sawdust and other debris from getting into your eyes.[1] Denver Hardwood Flooring
Most floors use a tongue-and-groove design for connecting adjacent strips. This design makes replacing a single strip or plank challenging, but not impossible. First, look for any nails in the damaged board and drive them as far through the board as possible by using a hammer and nail set. Carpenters use nail sets to drive nails flush with trim without damaging the trim with a hammer. After you’ve cleared the nails, it’s time to remove the damaged board and install a new one. Follow these steps: Denver Hardwood Floor Install
Refinish, refinish, refinish! In almost every case it is preferable to refinish rather than replace hardwood floors. Part of the appeal of hardwood is that it lasts so long. A quality hardwood floor can be sanded down and refinished at least six times, and up to ten times before you need to replace it. You can change the color, closely match and replace warped, stained, or termite ingested planks, silence squeaky boards, and fill gaps or patch knots. With all of these easy solutions, why would anyone choose to replace hardwood floors? Well, here are the cases when a complete rehaul becomes a better option. Hardwood Floors
Installing a hardwood floor yourself can save you money – if you know what you’re doing. Improper preparation and installation can lead to warping and buckling, which will ruin flooring that would otherwise remain beautiful for years to come. The most important thing you can do to ensure the structural integrity of your floor is to properly prepare for the installation process. Here are various articles to help you! Hardwood Floors
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