Refinish, refinish, refinish! In almost every case it is preferable to refinish rather than replace hardwood floors. Part of the appeal of hardwood is that it lasts so long. A quality hardwood floor can be sanded down and refinished at least six times, and up to ten times before you need to replace it. You can change the color, closely match and replace warped, stained, or termite ingested planks, silence squeaky boards, and fill gaps or patch knots. With all of these easy solutions, why would anyone choose to replace hardwood floors? Well, here are the cases when a complete rehaul becomes a better option.
Refinishing a floor takes a lot of time. You’ll need to remove all of the furniture from the room. The wood needs to be sanded bare. If you need to make a structural or cosmetic repair, you must do so before staining and coating. During the week that all of this is going on, nothing else can happen in that room. Dogs cannot walk through and sniff everything, children cannot bounce their balls, dust is everywhere, and the smell is enough to kill you. Well not really, but you get the idea. All of this time and trouble is reason enough for some homeowners to prefer having the old floor ripped out to put in something fresh and new. Hardwood Floors
Lowe’s has what you need to bring value-adding beauty to your home with hardwood flooring. There are plenty of species to choose from, including acacia wood flooring, walnut flooring, maple flooring, hickory hardwood flooring and cherry wood flooring. Depending on your budget and room’s traffic level, you’ll be sure to find a style to suit your needs. Denver Hardwood Flooring
Rigid Core flooring is a category of resilient flooring, and it has been designed from the ground up with modern homes in mind. It’s 100% waterproof, easy to install, and provides extreme scratch and indent resistance when compared to solid or engineered wood flooring. It also offers a wide range of design options because it isn’t limited to traditional wood species. Its hybrid visuals, exotic species, colors, and textures go above and beyond anything traditional wood flooring can offer. Denver Hardwood Floors
Some benefits of wood flooring include ease of cleaning, durability, and style variety. Wood floors are much easier to keep clean than carpet and pet hair or dander is quick to remove. They are very durable and with proper care, they will look great for years to come. Plus, wood flooring is available in a multitude of styles and colors guaranteeing there is a look out there for a classic or contemporary home. Denver Hardwood Floors

Installing a hardwood floor yourself can save you money – if you know what you’re doing. Improper preparation and installation can lead to warping and buckling, which will ruin flooring that would otherwise remain beautiful for years to come. The most important thing you can do to ensure the structural integrity of your floor is to properly prepare for the installation process. Here are various articles to help you!


This process begins with the same treatment process that the rotary peel method uses. However, instead of being sliced in a rotary fashion, with this technique the wood is sliced from the log in much the same manner that lumber is sawn from a log – straight through. The veneers do not go through the same manufacturing process as rotary peeled veneers. Engineered hardwood produced this way tends to have fewer problems with "face checking", and also does not have the same plywood appearance in the grain.[3] However, the planks can tend to have edge splintering and cracking because the veneers have been submerged in water and then pressed flat. Hardwood Floors

Awesome explanation! When I say heat pump to people, it's amazing how often their eyes glaze over...even though most of them have had refrigerators and air-conditioners their whole lives and have never asked themselves how they work. Same principle! Compressor and expansion valve (and the heat-holding capacity of a phase change; another confusing one for people). thanks for helping educate! Hardwood Floors
 116% harder than Red Oak (1)  12% harder than Red Oak (11)  123% Harder than Red Oak (4)  125% harder than Red Oak (2)  141% harder than Red Oak (2)  15% softer than Red Oak (2)  165% harder than Red Oak (2)  174% harder than Red Oak (5)  18% softer than Red Oak (1)  185% harder than Red Oak (4)  198 % harder than Red Oak (2)  2% harder than Red Oak (2)  2% Softer than Red Oak (1)  25% softer than Red Oak (1)  28% harder than Red Oak (1)  30% harder than Red Oak (8)  33% harder than Red Oak (2)  41% harder than Red Oak (7)  43% harder than Red Oak (1)  5% harder than Red Oak (8)  53% softer than Red Oak (1)  6% harder than Red Oak (14)  67% harder than Red Oak (5)  74% harder than Red Oak (2)  81% harder than Red Oak (2)  82% harder than Red Oak (2)  9% softer than Red Oak (1)  about the same as Red Oak (7)  Benchmark at 1290 on Janka Scale (37) Hardwood Floors
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