Wood flooring is any product manufactured from timber that is designed for use as flooring, either structural or aesthetic. Wood is a common choice as a flooring material and can come in various styles, colors, cuts, and species. Bamboo flooring is often considered a form of wood flooring, although it is made from a grass (bamboo) rather than a timber.[1] Hardwood Floors
This process begins with the same treatment process that the rotary peel method uses. However, instead of being sliced in a rotary fashion, with this technique the wood is sliced from the log in much the same manner that lumber is sawn from a log – straight through. The veneers do not go through the same manufacturing process as rotary peeled veneers. Engineered hardwood produced this way tends to have fewer problems with "face checking", and also does not have the same plywood appearance in the grain.[3] However, the planks can tend to have edge splintering and cracking because the veneers have been submerged in water and then pressed flat. Hardwood Floors
Eliminate any problem spots to make the subfloor level. Sand minor humps down with a hand-held or orbital sander to make the subfloor level. To fill any dips or low spots, use a leveling compound (also known as floor patch). Mix up the compound according to package directions, fill in the dips, then pull your straight piece of lumber back and forth over the spot to flatten and level it with the rest of the subfloor.[7]
Hardwood species used in flooring are given a hardwood hardness rating, which indicates how resistant the wood is to dents and wear. This rating is based off a test called the Janka Hardness Test, and it measures the force needed to press a steel ball into the wood sample. The highest possible score on this test is a little over 5,000, with most traditional solid wood floors scoring in the 1,000-2,000 range. The superior density of Rigid Core flooring would exceed the limitations of the Janka test, and instead a higher impact testing is needed to measure real world performance. Here is how the general hardness of plank flooring ranks:
Put on gloves, knee pads, and protective eye glasses. You'll be working diligently on your hands and knees for hours to complete this project, especially if you're doing a large space. Invest in a good pair of knee pads to protect your knees. Sturdy work gloves will protect your hands from splinters, and goggles will prevent sawdust and other debris from getting into your eyes.[1] Hardwood Floors
The natural process of things will tend to close gaps as the weather and humidity changes. As a rule, if the gap is less than the thickness of a dime, your flooring is normal and there’s nothing to worry about. If your gaps are more persistent, you might need to call in a professional to tighten up your hardwood floor so that they cease to be a problem.
Refinish, refinish, refinish! In almost every case it is preferable to refinish rather than replace hardwood floors. Part of the appeal of hardwood is that it lasts so long. A quality hardwood floor can be sanded down and refinished at least six times, and up to ten times before you need to replace it. You can change the color, closely match and replace warped, stained, or termite ingested planks, silence squeaky boards, and fill gaps or patch knots. With all of these easy solutions, why would anyone choose to replace hardwood floors? Well, here are the cases when a complete rehaul becomes a better option. Denver Hardwood Floors
Because tongue-and-groove boards are locked in place, removal involves cutting out the middle of each damaged board. The easiest way is to bore a 1-in.-dia. hole through both ends of each damaged board (photo 1). Then use a circular saw to connect the two holes (photo 2). Follow these steps to safely make the plunge cuts you need to repair your hardwood floors: 1. Adjust the depth of cut to the thickness of the floorboards. Plug in the saw and put on eye protection. 2. Pull back the retractable blade guard with your thumb. Then hold the nose of the baseplate on the floorboard and lift up the rear of the saw. 3. Align the blade with the right edge of one of the holes. Make sure the blade isn't touching the floor, then squeeze the trigger and slowly lower the spinning blade into the board. 4. Grip the saw firmly with both hands and guide it in a straight line until you cut into the right edge of the hole at the opposite end of the board. 5. Move back to the first hole, align the blade with the left edge and cut to the left edge of the second hole. Pry out the middle section with a hammer and chisel. Chop out the remaining edges, being careful not to damage any surrounding boards (photo 3). The "tongue" piece will be nailed in place, so break it out in small pieces. Then pull out the nails with a hammer or locking pliers. The existing floorboards have a tongue and groove milled on each end and along the edges. Chop off the tongue exposed by the board you just removed so you can slip in the new board (photo 4).
Tongue-and-groove: One side and one end of the plank have a groove, the other side and end have a tongue (protruding wood along an edge's center). The tongue and groove fit snugly together, thus joining or aligning the planks, and are not visible once joined. Tongue-and-groove flooring can be installed by glue-down (both engineered and solid), floating (mostly engineered only), or nail-down (not recommended for most engineered).
To fix a buckled floorboard, you need to be able to access the floor from below. The way to tackle this problem is to put weight on the buckled area from above — a cement block works well. Then install a 1 1/4-inch screw in the buckled flooring from below. Allow the screw to penetrate only halfway into the flooring, or it may come up through the finished surface. Driving the screw through the subfloor and into the flooring pulls the flooring down against the subfloor and gets rid of the buckled spot. Denver Hardwood Floor Install
Over the years, many hardwood floors develop small splits or cracks in the surface of the wood. These can be spot repaired with some angled nails to secure the two pieces together, along with some wood putty to hide the blemishes. If your floor is suffering from large cracks, however, you might want to think about refinishing the floor. And if the split is particularly bad, you should probably replace the damaged plank altogether. Denver Hardwood Floors
Price is the first obvious variable to consider. It is almost always cheaper to refinish your floor than to replace it. When replacing, you must consider the cost of the new wood as well as the installation. You can offset much of this cost by installing the floor yourself, but this is a very invasive process that requires specialized knowledge and precision. You can typically refinish a wood floor yourself, with just a few inexpensive solutions. Denver Hardwood Floor Install
We had bought and installed this beautiful product in our downstairs a few years ago. It's now time to do the upstairs and the product was the same excellent value for the price. Arrived quicker than we needed, but gives it time to acclimate to our home. We will be using the same installer and he was happy we are ordering the same product from the same company. He was VERY impressed by the quality of the product last time. I'm excited to see the completed project as I love this wood on our main floor. Denver Hardwood Floors
Enhance your home with beautiful hardwood flooring that Enhance your home with beautiful hardwood flooring that fits your budget. Full of abundant character and color variation Bruce Plano Gunstock Oak celebrates the beauty of natural hardwood. Enjoy natural features including mineral streaks knots and small holes and minor milling imperfections. Design your floor to your unique tastes with ...  More + Product Details Close Denver Hardwood Flooring
To fix a buckled floorboard, you need to be able to access the floor from below. The way to tackle this problem is to put weight on the buckled area from above — a cement block works well. Then install a 1 1/4-inch screw in the buckled flooring from below. Allow the screw to penetrate only halfway into the flooring, or it may come up through the finished surface. Driving the screw through the subfloor and into the flooring pulls the flooring down against the subfloor and gets rid of the buckled spot. Denver Hardwood Floor Install
Eliminate any problem spots to make the subfloor level. Sand minor humps down with a hand-held or orbital sander to make the subfloor level. To fill any dips or low spots, use a leveling compound (also known as floor patch). Mix up the compound according to package directions, fill in the dips, then pull your straight piece of lumber back and forth over the spot to flatten and level it with the rest of the subfloor.[7] Denver Hardwood Floors
"Click" or Woodloc systems: there are a number of patented "click" systems that now exist. These click systems are either "unilin" or "fiboloc" A "click" floor is similar to tongue-and-groove, but instead of fitting directly into the groove, the board must be angled or "tapped" in to make the curved or barbed tongue fit into the modified groove. No adhesive is used when installing a "click" floor, making board replacement easier. This system not only exists for engineered wood floors but also engineered bamboo and a small number of solid floors (such as "parador solido click") and is designed to be used for floating installations. It is beneficial for the Do-It-Yourself market. Denver Hardwood Floors
Jasper, Mazama, and the other brands of hardwood flooring we offer are premium quality, delivering everything you want in a hardwood floor - look, strength, durability, and ongoing value for properties. And we offer them to you at incredible pricing not found anywhere else. While we sell discount hardwood flooring, we will never sell cheap hardwood flooring. All of our products undergo rigorous product quality testing before we offer them to you and they are constantly rechecked for quality to ensure you always get the best products while still paying below wholesale prices. Denver Hardwood Floor Install

Refinishing a floor takes a lot of time. You’ll need to remove all of the furniture from the room. The wood needs to be sanded bare. If you need to make a structural or cosmetic repair, you must do so before staining and coating. During the week that all of this is going on, nothing else can happen in that room. Dogs cannot walk through and sniff everything, children cannot bounce their balls, dust is everywhere, and the smell is enough to kill you. Well not really, but you get the idea. All of this time and trouble is reason enough for some homeowners to prefer having the old floor ripped out to put in something fresh and new. Hardwood Floors
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