Glue down engineered hardwood, alternatively. If you don't want to nail down the boards, you do have the option of using adhesive to put engineered hardwood in place. It's a good choice, but won't last as long or be as sturdy as nailed down hardwood. The procedure is very similar to the nail-down process. Follow the adhesive manufacturer's instructions for installation and drying times.[11]
We had bought and installed this beautiful product in our downstairs a few years ago. It's now time to do the upstairs and the product was the same excellent value for the price. Arrived quicker than we needed, but gives it time to acclimate to our home. We will be using the same installer and he was happy we are ordering the same product from the same company. He was VERY impressed by the quality of the product last time. I'm excited to see the completed project as I love this wood on our main floor. Denver Hardwood Flooring
Add style, warmth, and value to your home with beautiful hardwood floors from The Home Depot. Our hardwood floors are available in solid and engineered hardwood, and a wide variety of colors, styles and wood species. Whether you’re interested in a traditional look, like a classic oak wood floor or something more modern and contemporary, like bamboo floors or cork flooring, we have everything you need to get your flooring project done.
Because tongue-and-groove boards are locked in place, removal involves cutting out the middle of each damaged board. The easiest way is to bore a 1-in.-dia. hole through both ends of each damaged board (photo 1). Then use a circular saw to connect the two holes (photo 2). Follow these steps to safely make the plunge cuts you need to repair your hardwood floors: 1. Adjust the depth of cut to the thickness of the floorboards. Plug in the saw and put on eye protection. 2. Pull back the retractable blade guard with your thumb. Then hold the nose of the baseplate on the floorboard and lift up the rear of the saw. 3. Align the blade with the right edge of one of the holes. Make sure the blade isn't touching the floor, then squeeze the trigger and slowly lower the spinning blade into the board. 4. Grip the saw firmly with both hands and guide it in a straight line until you cut into the right edge of the hole at the opposite end of the board. 5. Move back to the first hole, align the blade with the left edge and cut to the left edge of the second hole. Pry out the middle section with a hammer and chisel. Chop out the remaining edges, being careful not to damage any surrounding boards (photo 3). The "tongue" piece will be nailed in place, so break it out in small pieces. Then pull out the nails with a hammer or locking pliers. The existing floorboards have a tongue and groove milled on each end and along the edges. Chop off the tongue exposed by the board you just removed so you can slip in the new board (photo 4).

This process begins with the same treatment process that the rotary peel method uses. However, instead of being sliced in a rotary fashion, with this technique the wood is sliced from the log in much the same manner that lumber is sawn from a log – straight through. The veneers do not go through the same manufacturing process as rotary peeled veneers. Engineered hardwood produced this way tends to have fewer problems with "face checking", and also does not have the same plywood appearance in the grain.[3] However, the planks can tend to have edge splintering and cracking because the veneers have been submerged in water and then pressed flat. Denver Hardwood Floors
Engineered wood flooring was created to lower the cost of wood flooring and attempt to fix some of solid wood’s shortcomings. It’s constructed from inexpensive plywood or particle board and topped with a thin veneer of hardwood. This construction helps with installation flexibility and slightly improves indent performance, but it adds a new set of problems as well. Because the “real” wood part of the floor is just a thin veneer, damage from scratches can be irreparable. Engineered wood floors are still made from porous wood, meaning they can’t be subjected to water. Denver Hardwood Floors
Regardless of the floor, the protective finish will play a large role in how scratch and stain resistant it is. Both hardwood and Rigid Core flooring are available with various types of protective finishes. Rigid Core flooring goes a step beyond hardwood though, and also has a transparent solid wear layer that protects against gouging and deeper scratches. Denver Hardwood Floors
Engineered wood flooring has other benefits beyond dimensional stability and universal use. Patented installation systems allow for faster installation and easy replacement of boards. Engineered wood also allows for a floating installation where the planks are not adhered to the subfloor or to each other, further increasing ease of repair and reducing installation time. Engineered flooring is also suitable for underfloor and radiant heating systems. Hardwood Floors
Wood floors offer warmth and enhance the look of your rooms while increasing the value of your home. Wood flooring comes in a variety of styles and materials from solid hardwood to engineered hardwood to bamboo. You’ll find wooden floors also comes in a number of shades. In addition to looking great, wood floors are durable making them perfect for homes with pets and children.

Wood floors offer warmth and enhance the look of your rooms while increasing the value of your home. Wood flooring comes in a variety of styles and materials from solid hardwood to engineered hardwood to bamboo. You’ll find wooden floors also comes in a number of shades. In addition to looking great, wood floors are durable making them perfect for homes with pets and children.
Solid hardwood floors are made of planks milled from a single piece of timber. Solid hardwood floors were originally used for structural purposes, being installed perpendicular to the wooden support beams of a building known as joists or bearers. With the increased use of concrete as a subfloor in some parts of the world, engineered wood flooring has gained some popularity. However, solid wood floors are still common and popular. Solid wood floors have a thicker wear surface and can be sanded and finished more times than an engineered wood floor.[2] It is not uncommon for homes in New England, Eastern Canada, USA, and Europe to have the original solid wood floor still in use today. Denver Hardwood Flooring
With so many potential problems and repairs that a wood floor could need, you’re probably wondering how much the potential solutions will cost. It might make you feel better to know that the average wood floor repair costs around $1000, with minor repairs costing as little as a couple hundred and major jobs costing well in to the thousands. This is definitely a job that you’ll want to get a few quotes from contractors in order to feel comfortable with your particular repair needed or how you can repair the wood floor yourself. Hardwood Floors

Generally, hardwood floors need to be buffed every 3–5 years. The process usually takes about one day. Buffing refers to the process of using a stand up floor buffer. The floor is abraded with 180 grit screen on the buffer. This allows for the new coat of finish to mechanically adhere to the floor. This process works with great results as long as the floor hasn't had any waxes or synthetic cleaners. Denver Hardwood Floor Install
Maple is another great choice for hardwood flooring. Many people prefer its light tan look, which blends into home interior spaces. As one of the strongest woods, maple is a top choice for high-traffic areas of a home. The wood doesn’t scuff easily, making it a good choice for homes with children or those with a lot of foot traffic across the floors. Maple requires minimal maintenance, with weekly sweeping and annual applications of wood soap to prolong the life of the floors. Denver Hardwood Flooring

Refinishing can actually take much more time than fully replacing a wood floor. Refinishing is a messy, meticulous process than can take approximately four to five days, during which the floor surface must remain completely untouched. The process requires sanders, edgers, buffers, scrapers, brushes, base coat sealers, topcoat sealers, putty knives and sometimes paint. Replacement, on the other hand, can be done in considerably less time using only lumber, a couple of saws, measuring tape, a flat bar, a chalk line and a nail gun. Hardwood Floors
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