Sand off any paint or adhesive on the subfloor (if necessary). How pristine your subfloor needs to be depends on what kind of replacement flooring you're installing. If you plan to glue your new hardwood flooring down, sand away any paint or adhesive stuck to the subfloor with an electric sander. If you're installing nail-down, floating, or locking hardwood, you don't need to sand the subfloor.[5]
Cut a new length of flooring to fit snugly into the space of the old board. It doesn't matter what kind of saw you use to repair your hardwood floors; just make sure the cuts are perfectly square. After trimming the board to length, turn it upside down and use a chisel to chop off the lower lip of the grooved edge (photo 5). That allows it to fit over the protruding tongue of the adjacent floorboard. Test-fit the new piece. If it's slightly lower than the surrounding floorboards, shim it up with strips of kraft paper. Then remove the board and spread carpenter's glue on the tongues and grooves of the new and old pieces. Slip the new board into place (photo 6), protect it with a scrap-wood block and tap it down with a hammer. Cover the board with wax paper, then hold it down overnight with heavy books or weights. An alternative to gluing: Simply face-nail the board with 6d finishing nails. Bore pilot holes at a slight angle, then drive in the nails. Tap them below the surface with a nailset (photo 7) and fill the holes with wood putty. Lightly sand the entire board smooth, but be careful not to remove too much finish from surrounding boards. After finding a matching stain color by experimenting on scraps of flooring, stain the boards to match the original floor. Let dry overnight, then apply two coats of clear polyurethane varnish. If the old floor is unstained, just apply the polyurethane. Hardwood Floors

Durable and available in a variety of colors, hardwood flooring is a classic option for any home. Installation prices vary depending on the type of wood you choose. Depending upon your selections, the total cost for hardwood floor installation, including labor and materials, can average up to $6 to $8 per square foot. Keep reading to learn more about hardwood floor installation costs. Denver Hardwood Floors
Hardwood can match any décor, from traditional light wood floors to trendy white wood flooring, grey wood floors and dark wood floors. Start with unfinished hard wood flooring boards to create a blank canvas for stain and unique design. We also have hand-scraped hardwood and distressed wood flooring to add a rustic, timeworn look. A wide plank wood flooring can also make a room feel bigger and more modern. Hardwood flooring also has DIY installation that’s easy with tongue and groove flooring options.
This process involves treating the wood by boiling the log in water. After preparation, the wood is peeled by a blade starting from the outside of the log and working toward the center, thus creating a wood veneer. The veneer is then pressed flat with high pressure. This style of manufacturing tends to have problems with the wood cupping or curling back to its original shape. Rotary-peeled engineered hardwoods tend to have a plywood appearance in the grain.[3] Denver Hardwood Floor Install
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This process begins with the same treatment process that the rotary peel method uses. However, instead of being sliced in a rotary fashion, with this technique the wood is sliced from the log in much the same manner that lumber is sawn from a log – straight through. The veneers do not go through the same manufacturing process as rotary peeled veneers. Engineered hardwood produced this way tends to have fewer problems with "face checking", and also does not have the same plywood appearance in the grain.[3] However, the planks can tend to have edge splintering and cracking because the veneers have been submerged in water and then pressed flat. Denver Hardwood Floors
Oak has always been a popular choice for hardwood flooring. The color is visually appealing, looks inviting, and has many advantages. You’ll find the wood easier to clean, and it easily blends in with furniture and home interior designs you already have. Plus, oak is a good investment if you’re considering selling your house in the future, since the wood can last for many years. Hardwood Floors
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